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Carol's Cookies Cookie Company
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Cookie Blog

Getting Halloween Ready

Everyone knows this holiday is about two things.  The first is, it’s all about the candy.  Fun-size, over processed, nuggets of sugar. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t wish the tradition changed over to adorably dressed children ring doorbell, door opens, and a handful of Carol’s Cookies minis were handed out…But I digress.

The second part of Halloween, the most important part, is the costume.  Basically, if you dream it, you can be it. It can be extremely overwhelming…where do you even start?  Well, for us, it’s a bit easier.  We eat, sleep, breathe, think, and live for cookies.  So naturally, we favor costumes of the doughy, sweet treat variety.  And we couldn’t encourage you more to take suit…and suit up as your favorite treat this holiday.  And don’t forget to let us see!

Our most FAQ

We love to hear from our friends, fans, and those just learning about our cookies.  We try to be helpful and provide answers to the most Frequently Asked Questions here (http://carolscookies.com/faq).  But the one question we get asked the most is, “How do you make your cookies so big?!”  We get it.  This question comes from the same mind-boggling, inconceivable place where we wonder, “How does the Tooth Fairy get under our pillows while we sleep?” and “What type of Spanx does Santa put on to shimmy down the chimney.”  They are the universal questions that keep us up at night.

But you’re in luck!  Tonight you can sleep easy and save the worries of the world for another day.  Creating our cookies should be a snap after reading this.

To make our cookies so big, we start with using just the right amount of fats to form correct cohesion and adhesion of ingredients.  This allows our cookies to be dense, yet cooked through, chewy, yet melt in your mouth.  The molecules must be solidly brought together to form the base.  Without it, we would be left with neat little piles of eggs, flour, and Ghirardelli Chocolate.

Speaking of eggs, you want to add your eggs whole, one at a time. But that makes the mixing a little more difficult.  Egg whites are largely water and they don’t mix well with cohesion agents.  But we warn you, too much mixing and you’re in danger of over-mixing.  Over-mixing results in a holey mess that falls apart as soon as it’s lifted off the cookie sheet.  And if you’re not using the right flour, well that totally throws off the protein structure and gluten levels and the ingredients won’t be able to bind.

You’ll need acidity and carbon dioxide to create a strong protein bond with the correct flour.  If your bond isn’t strong, all the good stuff is evaporated away.  A strong bond keeps our dough stiff, and the right level of acidity firms our cooking dough faster, which results in our thick cookies (not spread thin like you so often find).  But that all goes to waste if you don’t mix enough.  The importance of the mixing time of the dough is everything.  Mix too little and you won’t get enough air pockets to be filled with CO2, mix too much and your cookie looks like meal worms invaded.

The last step to consider in making Carol’s-Cookie-sized cookies is temperature.  You want the kinetic energy of the particles to be just right.  You want to be right where the energy within the plasma collisions is high enough to overcome the Coulomb barrier and the cookie particles fuse together into one massive cookie without cracking.

And of course, the perfection of dough you just created is nothing unless you’re dropping 1/2lb softball-sized scoops of it on your cookie tray.

Now you should be set to go ahead and recreate your own version of Carol’s Cookies in your fridge.

What?  You’re confused?  Well, you didn’t really think we were going to divulge our most sacred secrets, did you?

American as...

We’ve all heard the saying, “American as apple pie” and I’m sure many of you are planning on adding a juicy, lattice-topped pastry to your 4th of July plans.  But what if I told you that to really represent all thing Americana in your festivities, you’re better off adding chocolate chip cookies to that buffet table?

The concept of apple pie actually came from Europeans in the thirteenth century.  Prior to colonization, there wasn’t an apple tree to be seen stateside.  If you really want to go back, Apple trees can be traced back to central Asia.

he chocolate chip cookie on the other hand, was born, bred, and mastered in the good ole U.S. of A.  It’s creation came some time after apple pies were being served, but it is in fact a 100% American dessert.  Ruth Wakefield (who should be celebrated daily for her genius) invented the chocolate chip cookie in the late 1930’s at her Massachusetts restaurant, Toll House.  In 1939 when the cookie-craze was hot, Wakefield sold the recipe and the Toll House name to Nestlé for a dollar.

Wakefield’s original recipe:

Via KingArthurFlour.com

And just like Wakefield’s original recipe, Carol’s Cookies prides itself on using all natural ingredients and hand-making each of our cookies into perfection.  The biggest difference is that while Wakefield used a half-teaspoon of dough, we tend to use more of a fist-sized amount.  And who can argue that more cookie is ever a bad thing?

So this July 4th it might be time to rethink your dessert option and include a tray of Carol’s Chocolate Chip Cookies.  It can be a fun conversation starter, an accurate celebration of our great nation, and a delicious treat.  I can’t guarantee the phrase “American as Chocolate Chip cookies” will catch on, but we can always try!

For your 4th of July order, please visit http://www.carolscookies.com/order-cookies/

Ice Cream Sundae Pie

Crush up a variety of Carol’s Cookies, your choice, and roll them using a little butter to form a pie crust.   Line the bottom of a pie pan with this crust.  Swirl vanilla ice cream or frozen yogurt and chocolate sauce together, fill the pie pan with the Carol’s Cookies pie crust and fill it with the ice cream or frozen yogurt.   Freeze it and serve when you want to be the life of the party.

Fruit Pizza

Fill a disposable pie pan with Carol’s Cookies Old-Fashioned Sugar Cookie Dough.   Bake it in a convection oven at 350 degrees and let cool to room temperature.  Fill with fruit of your choice (we prefer berries) and top with whipped cream.  Serve chilled and prepare to make friends.

Cookie Sandwiches

Scooping heaping spoonfuls of Carol’s Cookie dough onto a baking sheet and bake as directed.  Cool cookies completely to room temperature.  Use fresh made buttercream frosting (or cheat and use store bought) and frost bottom of one cookie...top with another cookie and you are sure to be an instant hit.

Carol's Cookie Truffles

Roll your cookie dough into truffle-sized balls, then freeze. Dip them in melted candy coating or chocolate that will harden.  Please note that we do not promote eating raw cookie dough…we do use ultra-pasteurized eggs...but the warning is actually because eating our cookie dough can be extremely addicting!  Consider yourself warned….

Heavenly Peanut Butter Pie

Place a tub of carols cookie dough at the bottom of a spring form pan. Bake the dough at 375 for about 20 minutes or till little browned. Once the dough is completely cooled...spread the ice cream over the entire crust and freeze. Next, crush the cookie into Tiny pieces and sprinkle on top of the entire pie and freeze again.heavenly-peanut-butter-pie

Option...you can drizzle melted chocolate or caramel on top of the cookie to look pretty.

Cut and enjoy!

Blondies

Fill a clear 8X8 or 9X9 Pyrex glass dish using Carol’s Cookies Chocolate Chip or Old-Fashioned Sugar Cookie Dough (approximately 1” thick).  Load peanut butter chips on top and additional semi-sweet chocolate chips.  Add a thin layer of condensed milk.  Bake at 350 degrees for 12 minutes or until the dough is golden brown.  Serve warm or chilled...it’s sinful either way!